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Drought Leaves Trees with Big Thirst

An Oak tree showing signs of stress due to high temperatures and lack of rain.
An Oak tree showing signs of stress due to high temperatures and lack of rain.

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Published October 20, 2011 By WYNDI VEIGEL

 

Leaves continue to fall off trees. Branches continue to snap. Drought-resistant trees such as cedars, which have thrived in the past, seem to be having a hard time surviving in the area.

All of these are the results of a drought in Texas that is expected to continue into 2012 and could change the way landscapes and trees are used in the state for the rest of history.

Already the high temperatures and lack of rain have impacted areas across the state especially in city parks and forests.

Arborist Steve Houser, who works with Arborilogical Services in Dallas and Fort Worth, said he believes the drought will require people to think carefully about landscaping needs in the future.

According to Houser, one issue that the landscaping company is seeing is that people are overwatering their trees which causes them to have shallow roots.

For example, he said, if a willow tree is planted in a creek or stream and suddenly the water in that creek is gone, the tree will become stressed and eventually die.

For the complete story see the Oct. 20 edition of The Farmersville Times.

About the author

Ms. Wyndi Veigel

Ms. Veigel is a news editor and staff writer for The Farmersville Times.

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